Linderhof Palace – tickets, prices, waiting, tours from Munich, what to see

  • Public transport is not very reliable, so most book a tour from Munich
  • Advance booking of tickets helps avoid long waiting
  • Most tourists tour Linderhof Palace along with Neuschwanstein Castle
Linderhof Palace in Ettal

Linderhof Palace in Ettal is one of the most artistic and stylish complex of the 19th century. 

Of all the three palaces built by King Ludwig II of Bavaria, Linderhof Castle was the only one completed during his lifetime. 

This masterpiece, influenced by French architecture and modeled on the small summer palaces, attracts half a million tourists every year. 

This article shares everything you need to know before buying your Linderhof Palace tickets.

1. How to reach
2. Opening hours
3. Waiting period
4. Ticket prices
5. Linderhof Palace tickets
6. Linderhof and Neuschwanstein
7. Linderhof from Munich
8. Linderhof from Frankfurt
9. Inside the Palace
10. Linderhof Palace Park
11. Weather advice

How to reach Linderhof Palace

Linderhof Palace is in the Graswang Valley, near the village of Ettal.

It is 95 Km (60 miles) from Munich and 450 km (280 miles) from Frankfurt. 

Linderhof Palace address: Linderhof 12, 82488 Ettal, Germany. Get Directions

By public transport

From Munich Central Station, you can board a Regionalbahn train to get to Oberammergau Station.

Also known as RB trains, Regionalbahns connect city centers and far off regions. 

The journey from Munich to Oberammergau takes approximately two hours. 

Once you get down at the station, you must board bus number 9622 to get to Linderhof Palace.

Linderhof Palace is 12 kms (7.5 miles) from the train station, and the bus takes approximately 35 minutes to get there. 

Bus No 9622 is not frequent, especially on weekends, so it is better to check the timetable before stepping out.

Because of this unreliable public transport, most tourists prefer Linderhof Palace tours that include transportation

Driving to Linderhof

While driving from Munich to Linderhof Palace, you should take the A95 motorway and then the B2 road to Oberau. Follow the signs in Oberau to head towards road B23 (Ettaler Straße).

Outside of Ettal, turn left and take the road St2060 to reach Linderhof and then turn right for the palace.

Note: If you plan to drive during the winter months (October to April), winter equipment such as snow tires and snow chains are required. 

Parking at Linderhof Castle

Around 550 cars and 20 coaches can park at the Linderhof Castle’s paid parking lot.

There are ample parking slots for all visitors. 


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Linderhof Palace opening hours

During the peak months (1 Apr to 15 Oct), the Linderhof Palace opens at 9 am and closes at 6 pm. 

During the lean months (16 Oct to 31 Mar), the palace opens late at 10 am and closes early at 4.30 pm. 

Moroccan House and Moorish Kiosk

From 15 Apr to 15 Oct, the Moroccan House and Moorish Kiosk open at 9 am and close at 6 pm daily. 

From 16 Oct to 14 Apr, it remains closed. 

Gurnemanz Hermitage

From 15 Apr to 15 Oct, the Gurnemanz Hermitage opens at 9 am and closes at 6 pm daily.

It stays closed for the rest of the year. 

Exhibition at the Royal Lodge

During the peak summer months of 1 Apr to 15 Oct, the Exhibition at the Royal Lodge opens at 9 am and closes at 6 pm daily.

From 16 Oct to 31 Mar, it only stays open on Sundays, public holidays and Bavarian School holidays, from noon till 4:30 pm.

Timings of the fountain at Linderhof Palace

The waterworks at Linderhof’s Palace happens only from mid-April to mid-October. 

During this period, they start daily at 9 am and close at 6 pm, with a fountain show every half an hour interval.

Ticket office timings

The Ticket office starts operation half an hour before the Linderhof Palace opens and closes half an hour before the palace closes.

When is Linderhof Palace closed?

The Palace of Linderhof stays closed on public holidays, and all buildings remain closed on 1 Jan. 

Apart from this, it also remains closed on Shrove Tuesday (the day before Ash Wednesday) and on 24, 25, 31 Dec.


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Linderhof Palace waiting period

If you decide to purchase your tickets at Linderhof Palace, depending on the time of day and the season, you may have to wait in long queues at the ticket counter.

During peak season, the waiting may even exceed an hour.

Check out the Tripadvisor reviews of some of the visitors here, here, and here

When you purchase Linderhof Palace tickets online, in advance, you get to skip these long lines.

Waiting at Linderhof Palace
Crowd waiting in front of the Linderhof Palace. Image: Castlephiletravels.com

Buying the tickets online has yet another advantage – you can avoid the ‘curse of the timed ticket.’

Let us explain.

Curse of the ‘timed ticket’

Only a limited number of tourists are allowed inside Linderhof Palace at a time, and the timed ticket helps the authorities ensure this limit. 

When you buy your tickets at the venue, you may have to wait in the long ticketing queue, and you may also have to wait for your time slot to arrive.

Here is a timeline to help you understand this better:

  • You arrive at Linderhof Palace in Ettal, at 11 am
  • After waiting in the ticketing queue for 45 minutes, you finally buy your tickets at 11.45 am.
  • Since all tickets till 1 pm were sold out (remember, only a limited number of visitors can be inside at any point in time), you get tickets for the next available slot, which is 1.15 pm.
  • Even though you have your Linderhof Palace ticket at 11.45 am, you still have to hang around at the entrance till 1.15 pm.

This additional wait is known as the ‘curse of the timed ticket.’

You can avoid the long wait in the ticketing queue and wait for your time slot to arrive by purchasing the Linderhof Palace tickets in advance.


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Linderhof Palace prices

Entry tickets for Linderhof Palace can be bought online or from the ticket center at the entrance to Linderhof Park.

The Linderhof Palace ticket price for adults is €7.50, and kids 18 years and below enter for free. 

Visitors above 65 years of age and students with valid IDs qualify for €1 discount on the adult ticket price and pay only €6.50 for their admission.  

However, this ticket price doesn’t include your travel to Linderhof Palace and back. 

Since Linderhof is 95 Km (60 miles) from Munich, and because public transport options aren’t very reliable, we recommend you book a Linderhof Palace tour that includes transportation


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Linderhof Castle tickets

We recommend you purchase the tickets online, and in advance, for two reasons:

  • You can avoid the queue at the ticket counter
  • You can book a tour which includes transportation to the Linderhof Palace and back, which is far more convenient

Visitors can only explore Linderhof Castle in Ettal as part of a guided tour. 

Linderhof Palace tickets

Even if you want to, you can’t explore it on your own – it’s just the Castle’s policy. 

Guided tours of Linderhof Castle last approximately 30 minutes and are are available in English and German.

Image: New-swan-stone.eu

We list some of our favourite Linderhof Palace tours –

1. Linderhof Palace and Neuschwanstein Castle

This trip is the most popular Linderhof Palace (and Neuschwanstein Castle) tour from Munich. 

Both these Castles were the dream projects of King Ludwig II of Bavaria.

The 10-hour tour starts at 8.30 am from Munich.

Itinerary of Linderhof Palace and Neuschwanstein Castle tour

The group boards a luxury air-conditioned tour bus for the 95 Km (60 miles) journey to Linderhof. 

Audio Guides are available both in the bus and the Castle in Spanish, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian.

Once you reach the Linderhof Park entrance, you get down and walk 1.5 km (one mile approximately) to the Palace entrance. 

This leisurely walk on the uphill road takes approximately 30 minutes.

After a guided tour of the palace, you board the bus to go to the tiny Bavarian town Oberammergau for some photos and shopping. 

The next stop is Ludwig’s childhood home of Hohenschwangau, where you have your lunch. Lunch is not part of the tour costs. 

Next, you board the bus for the trip to Neuschwanstein Castle, in the foothills of the Alps.

After a guided tour of Neuschwanstein Castle, you get back to Munich around 7 pm. 

Note: The entrance fee to both the Palaces, which comes to €27 per adult and €6 per child, is not part of this tour cost. The guide will help you purchase the tickets at the venue.

Tour prices

Adult ticket (27+ years): €57
Youth ticket (15 to 26 years): €46
Child ticket (4 to 14 years): €29
Infant ticket (Less than 3 years): Free entry

Visitors who prefer to customize their visit can opt for the private tour of both the Castles.

Follow the link to book a tour of Neuschwanstein and Linderhof Castles in Spanish.

2. Linderhof Palace tour from Munich

This tour is ideal for travelers who only want to visit Linderhof Palace. 

However, you need at least four participants to book this tour. 

You start from Munich at 8.30 am and drive towards the German Alps into the Ettal. 

You stop at the 14th-Century Ettal Abbey, home to a community of about 50 monks.

Then your small group of not more than eight continue to the Royal Palace of Linderhof.

After a guided tour of the smallest Place built by legendary King Ludwig II, you get some free time to explore the surrounding Park. 

The group stops at Oberammergau for some photos, Bavarian air, and lunch on the return trip. 

Note: The Linderhof Palace entrance fee of €8.50 is not part of the tour costs. 

Tour prices

Adult ticket (18+ years): €65
Military ticket (18 to 26 years, ID): €60
Student ticket (17 to 26 years, ID): €59
Youth ticket (10 to 17 years): €59
Child ticket (5 to 9 years): €55
Infant ticket (Less than 4 years): €49

3. Day trip from Frankfurt: Neuschwanstein & Linderhof 

This 14-hour long trip starts in Frankfurt at 8.30 am. 

Depending on how big the group is, you board a bus or a minivan and visit two of the most famous royalty houses in Bavaria. 

The group first visits the fairytale Castle Neuschwanstein and explores its beautifully decorated rooms.

From Neuschwanstein, you start for Schloss Linderhof in Ettal village, 45 km (28 miles) away.

A local guide takes you around the smallest palace built by legendary King Ludwig II, after which you are on the return journey to Frankfurt. 

Tour prices

Adult ticket (13+ years): €325
Child ticket (less than 12 years): €195


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Inside Linderhof Palace

The Linderhof Castle interiors are sure to leave you amazed.

Map of Linderhof Palace

Since all visitors must explore Linderhof Palace as part of a guided tour, there are no chances of getting lost or missing out on an important room. 

However, if you are aware of the palace’s layout, you will know what to expect. 

Floor plan of Linderhof Palace
Image: Schlosslinderhof.de

We detail the numerous Linderhof Palace inside rooms in the order in which you will see them during the guided tour.

Guided tour of Linderhof Palace starts from the Vestibule.

1. Vestibule 

The building might seem like a large villa from the outside, but the inside will make you believe it’s a palace. 

Vestibule of Linderhof Castle

The vestibule has a statue of Louis XIV of France in the middle of the room, a smaller copy of a monument erected in Paris in 1699.

You can see the Sun King’s head surrounded by golden beams of light on the ceiling. 

Two angels fly in front of it, which carries the motto of the Bourbons in their hands. The slogan reads – Not unequal to many.

2. Western Tapestry Chamber

The tour of the King’s rooms begins with the tapestry room. The stunning visuals of the room take the viewer into the King’s world of love and harmony.

The room’s ceiling painting is of Apollo receiving Venus, which is an indication of what to expect in the evenings. 

3. Yellow Cabinet

The next three rooms relate to each other wrt to their floor plan – two small semicircular cabinets enclose an oval Audience Chamber.

This room gets its name from the yellow wall coverings and ornamental panels.

This Yellow Cabinet has carved, embroidered, and stuccoed ornaments in silver, and the rest of the surface is light blue, which compliments the elegant trio of colors.

4. Audience Chamber

Audience Room at Linderhof Castle

The Audience Chamber is a lavishly furnished room with multiple French court references.

The King never actually received any legations in this room, and that’s why it got used as an office.

Image: Schlosslinderhof.de

Don’t miss the gold-plated bronze desk set under the canopy.

5. Lilac Cabinet

The furniture and wall coverings are made of lilac silk and were meant to prepare the visitor for the adjacent bedroom. 

It is similar in design to the Yellow Cabinet.

6. King’s Bedroom

King Ludwig II's bedroom at Linderhof Palace

The King’s bedroom is huge for a relatively smaller Palace. 

In the center of the palace’s most expensive room is a gigantic bed, overseen by a canopy.

Ludwig’s symbolic color blue dominates the room. 

Above the bed, flying angels hold the Bavarian crown aloft.

Image: Schlosslinderhof.de

7. Pink Cabinet

The East Wing and the West Wing of the Palace are identical, and the Pink Cabinet served as the dressing room for the King. 

The whole room is covered in pink, and wall panels portray the Court of Versailles’ members.

8. Dining Room

The Dining Room is decorated with carvings on the wall, which depict how the food comes to the table – gardening, hunting, fishing, and farming.

Dining Room at Linderhof Palace

The table in the center is the main attraction and also known as the Wishing Table.

Linderhof Palace table sets itself up via a crank mechanism to be lowered to the kitchen to fill it. 

It is an 18th-century invention that allowed the Royals to dine without anyone watching over them. 

Image: Schlosslinderhof.de

Besides, the King also loved to have his food alone and undisturbed.

9. Blue Cabinet

The Blue Cabinet is the fourth and last cabinet you will see on the guided tour. 

It is beautifully carved with blue silk covering. 

The pastels on the wall show various personalities from the French court under Louis XV.

10. Eastern Tapestry Chamber

This room is a counterpart of the Western Tapestry Chamber, and its interior decoration is very much similar. 

Apollo and Aurora, who symbolize the morning, are painted on the ceiling since the room is East facing.

11. Linderhof Palace Hall of Mirrors

There is hardly a spot in Linderhof Palace’s Hall of Mirrors, which isn’t covered by the mirror.

Hall of Mirror Linderhof Palace

Everything in this room is opulent – the large mirrors, the centrally heated fireplaces, beautiful chimney, the furniture, the carpets, and the marble sculptures.

Image: Schlosslinderhof.de

Wherever one looks, one will find a new reflection and exquisite ivory chandelier creates an effect of infinite candles on the wall.

Being a night person, the King is more likely to have spent his nights in the Hall of Mirrors marveling at the candle reflections.

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What to see in Linderhof Park

A park surrounds Schloss Linderhof.

Court Garden Director Carl von Effner designed the Park, which combines elements of the French Baroque garden and the English landscape garden.

There are many things to see and do in the Linderhof Palace park, and we explain a few of them below. Download map

1. Moroccan House

Moroccan House at Linderhof Park

This building was acquired at the World Exhibition in Paris in 1878, and at Ludwig II’s request, re-modeled from inside.

Initially built in Stockalpe near the Austrian border, in 1998, it got reconstructed in the Palace park.

Image: Grainau.de

2. Royal Lodge

Three different monarchs have used the Royal Lodge as a hunting lodge and a living palace. 

It was built around 1790, at the spot where the Castle rests now. 

However, in 1874, it got moved to the Linderhof Palace park at the King’s request.

Ludwig II lived in it before the palace was completed, and after the King’s death, it was often used by Prince Regent Luitpold.

The Exhibition in the Royal Lodge covers topics such as the building’s origins as a farm, its use by the royal family, and its significance as a planning office for Ludwig II’s many building projects.

3. Terrace Gardens

Terrace Gardens at Linderhof Park
Image: Germany.travel

The Italianate garden style inspired the three terraces on the slope known as the ‘Linderbichl.’ 

Don’t miss out on the two lions in cast zinc, the Naiad Fountain, and the bust of Queen Marie Antoinette of France.

4. Music Pavilion

A cascade of thirty marble steps characterizes the Northern part of the Park. 

The bottom end of this cascade is the Neptune fountain and at the top is the Music Pavilion.

The Music Pavilion is a giant wooden structure looking across the palace from the North towards Venus’s temple.

5. Moorish Kiosk 

Like the Moroccan House, the Moorish Kiosk was also created for the World Exhibition in Paris in 1867. 

King Ludwig II purchased it in 1876 and decorated it with a glass chandelier, a marble fountain, and a beautiful Peacock Throne. 

6. Hunding’s Hut 

Hunding's Hut at Linderhof Palace
Image: Wikimedia

It is modeled on the Hunding’s dwelling in the first act of the “Walküre” from the “Ring des Nibelungen.” 

It has been destroyed by fire twice and re-built – the last time in 1990.

7. Hermitage of Gurnemanz  

This small building is modeled on the third act of the Wagner opera “Parsifal” and constructed near the Hunding’s Hut.

8. Linderhof Palace grotto

The Linderhof Venus Grotto is a natural stage built by court building director Georg Dollmann and landscape sculptor August Dirigl.

This grotto depicts the 1st act of Richard Wagner’s opera ‘Tannhäuser’ and has an artificial lake and a waterfall.

Venus grotto at Linderhof Palace
Image: Stefano Nichelini

Dollmann and Dirigl set up one of the world’s first electric power stations to power 12 dynamos, which would light up the cavern featuring a Lorelei rock, a royal seat, and a gilt boat designed in the shape of a shell. 

The machine house, which is still available, was built 100m away from the Venus Grotto, and it was one of the first electricity works in Bavaria.

The King’s used the cave for his private use.


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Linderhof Palace weather

The best season to visit Linderhof Palace by car in summer. The skies are clear, and you can take in the scenic beauty of the surrounding land while you travel. 

During winter, road blockages, avalanches, storms, and wintry roads with reduced visibility and sloppy direction control are some of the main reasons why it becomes hazardous to drive to the Linderhof Palace. 

From October to April, you may need special equipment to beat the sloppy winter roads as you journey towards Linderhof. 

Before starting your road trip to Linderhof Palace, please get the latest advice from ADAC and OAMTC.

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